Monday, June 11, 2007

Yet more anxiety and amusement all rolled into one.

Remember the doily I knit for a wedding present? This one?

Uh, yeah. The wedding was last weekend. What I did NOT know, was that most of the groom's family is Mennonite. The Mennonites are related to the Amish, and shun the technology of the modern world. Meaning, they still SEW AND KNIT THEIR OWN CLOTHING. I just sent off a doily I chose for easy, quick knitting, to one of the last groups of people in the country who still takes knitting seriously as an everyday way to dress their children.

And I chose the pattern to be easy.

Urgh. Hopefully I will never meet these people.

14 comments:

Bells said...

Oh come on, surely they'll be impressed?

Donna said...

I'm with Bells - I'm sure they'll be impressed by the work you put in.

Dana said...

I married to a mennonite guy (well, he isn't but his family is), and they will be so wowed that an "outsider" still practices the craft. perhaps it will be viewed as a nod and homage to the union.

NeedleTart said...

I recently spent some time with The Baby's (no, my baby!) new girlfriend's family. Her father is "fallen-away" Amish and he was impressed that I was making socks. In fact he agreed to let his daughter come here for two weeks. Maybe the recipient will be impressed that you cared enough to make something rather than go shopping, even if you think it's too simple for words (are you nuts?! tiny littel needles, tiny little stitches....)

Lynn said...

At least it's with someone that will appreciate it!

Terby said...

I think it's beautiful. Simple things, made with skill, made by hand, made with love and appreciation of the craft. How is that not an appropriate gift? An electric hand mixer - that would be a bad gift.

Janelle said...

I agree with the others. It was a perfect gift, especially for someone from a Mennonite family. How much more appropriate is that than something store-bought? Besides, although you chose it to be "easy," it doesn't look easy. It looks beautiful. Although his family is Mennonite, surely not all of them are knitters, and easy pattern or not, they will appreciate the time you took to knit it for them.

Alwen said...

I can see you need us to come down there and cut you some slack!

Come on, beautiful skilled knitting, nice regular even stitches . . . and it was way better than giving them a candy-apple red iPod.

I had my couch reupholstered by the Mennonite man down the road. The Amish are the strict ones: horse and buggy, no electricity, no buttons on men's outer garments.

Mennonites allow cars (my couch rode up and down the road in their Suburban) and electricity, but still use plain dress and stress simplicity.

Kristen said...

There are Mennonites somewhere in my family, because they keep showing up at the hillbilly reunion in August. They show up in cars and they keep pop cold with ice in a cooler. About the only difference I really notice is that the women wear skirts or dresses and put their hair up in something that looks like a coffee filter.

Don't fret. I'm sure your gift will be appreciated for the work you put into it, and if anyone gives it a hairy eyeball, they can throw down the gauntlet and challenge you to a duel.

Amy Lane said...

Hey--remember, if they're Menonites, they probably don't blog...and they like stuff plain...your pattern will probably be almost too fancy for the family, but because it's handmade, they'll love it.

Jejune said...

I'm sure they'll love it - how many of their 'non-Mennonite' friends would have sent something handmade? It'll be treasured for years to come :)

Nina said...

I love all these sweet comments! Cos I'm gonna say the same thing--the time; effort; thoughtfulness to put the time and effort into making something; and even now, the concern you have that this gift may not be "good enough"--all will be appreciated by the recipients.

Really, I have to agree with those who have pointed out that not everyone would be a knitter. Indeed, not every Amish or Mennonite community would necessarily excel at all handmade crafts. For example, any Amish-made furniture generally comes from the Pennsylvania area. When we spent part of our summer driving through central-eastern Illinois, the Amish community there apparently was more into sewing than fibrecrafts such as spinning and knitting. Nary a yarn shop, and barely any yarn, in sight.

So, you never know. And I know, I'm only talking about the Amish communities I know of, so it may not even apply to your Mennonite friends. In any case, I know your kind gift will be much loved. :)

lisamaesc said...

I'm going to be on Seabrook Island the week of July 4th. Where are some good yarn and fabric stores in the Charleston area?

sienna said...

I, too, have known Mennonites (united Mennonites, actually) who drove, played video games, etc. But if these Mennonites are, in fact, the kind who shun modern luxuries and knit their own clothes they would probably not have time to make such luxuries as lace doilies anyway!