Friday, February 15, 2008

Better than a stick in the eye.


It didn't jump off the flyer hooks and turn into a massive snarl, anyway. But as you can see, I'm still having trouble with the yarn feeding evenly onto the bobbin. (And in case you're wondering what the hell that is, it's the leftover Lopi from the first Steeked Jacket. I figure Lopi was originally intended to be used like pencil roving, so why not use it for practice?)



I fished the first of the two hibiscus-dyed skeins of yarn out of the dye pot today. Yes, it's been soaking for three days. Every morning I would put heat under it and simmer it for about an hour, both to set the color and to keep any ickies from breeding in the goo.

The photo was taken under full spectrum light, but I just can't capture the color. It's about halfway between a dark mauve and a grayed lavender. No idea what to call it. Probably "Hibiscus dyed superwash sock yarn, 440 yards". Right up there with Toccota and Fugue in D minor for naming creativity.

The other skein is now in the drink for a three day bath. After that, I'm not sure what I'll try. Cochineal, maybe.



Oh, and I found my futon.

9 comments:

Maggie said...

I bought a ton of unspun Lopi when I was in Iceland. The people there "spin" in by winding it into a ball two or three times. I guess the more you wind it the more spin it gets in it, and the stronger it gets.

It would be perfect practice for spinning. Yours looks good so far, I'm impressed. I truly suck at spinning.

NeedleTart said...

THe Rabbi's sermon this week was on the Priestly robes that Aaron wore. She seemed a little surprized that I could discuss ancient coloring techniques (Why?) Thanks for the extra background.

Allison said...

Mauvendar, maybe?

And I am really enjoying the color series.

Alwen said...

Horizontal surfaces have an attractive force, and draw objects to themselves. Spare beds, ironing boards, desks, tabletops, they all have a sort of extra gravity.

One of the most disappointing (and educational) coloring experiences I ever had was when I used pokeberries to make ink.

It started out a lovely red-purple, aged to grayish-brown within a month or so, and after some years, completely disappeared. It wasn't just "not lightfast," it was just plain not fast at all.

Amy Lane said...

Oh...there it was--under the cat!

I"m thinking that if I actually saw that color, I'd love it...

Donna Lee said...

The color came out really well. I like the grey/purple combination. I have crocuses that color. It reminds me of spring.

Roz said...

Enough about the yarn. Let's talk about that interesting blue table behind the futon. What is its story? Speak!

Theresa said...

Love the hibiscus dye color I would call it something romantic like dawn or twilight

ladylinoleum said...

Actually, that's a great way to practice plying. I wish I would have thought of that when I began! Looking good!